Learning Communities

Learning Communities are an exciting opportunity for deep engagement in subjects with reinforcement of concepts, ideas, and materials in both courses!

You and your peers will enroll in two courses organized around common themes, goals, projects, assignments, and/or objectives. You must enroll in both courses to be in the Learning Community. The benefits of Learning Communities are:

  1. Enjoy learning about the same theme from the perspective of two different instructors
  2. Form a close, supportive community with your peers in two classes
  3. Easily transition into college
  4. Engage and reinforce the course material more deeply through a theme or project

The combination of students from different backgrounds and faculty from different disciplines leads to greater understanding of the diversity of knowledge. Students will be more active participants in Learning Community classes with guidance from the faculty team. Richland College offers currently two types of Learning Communities:

  1. COORDINATED STUDIES - The faculty in both courses in the Learning Community work together with all students enrolled in both the classes within the Learning Community focused on a common theme to learn more about the specific disciplines and how they relate to each other. Two faculty members team teach together in the same classroom at the same time in the two coordinated courses. Students are concurrently enrolled in both courses that are part of the learning community.
  2. LINKED COMMUNITIES - The faculty in both classes in the Linked Community work together to help students find commonalities between the disciplines. Two faculty members teach separately in credit hour courses which are linked to one another. Faculty members do not teach in the same classroom at the same time. Students are concurrently enrolled in both courses that are part of the learning community.
Learning Communities Faculty

The combination of students from different backgrounds and faculty from different disciplines leads to greater understanding of the diversity of knowledge. Students will be more active participants in Learning Community classes with guidance from the faculty team.

What are the benefits to faculty? Faculty will

  • Develop integrative, interdisciplinary assignments
  • Discover common ground with other faculty members
  • Develop working relationships with other faculty members
  • Improve students’ learning inside and outside of the classroom

Faculty members proposing a Learning Community must complete a Learning Communities Proposal Form. Return proposals to Kathleen Stephens at kstephens@dcccd.edu by June 8, 2018, to be considered for spring 2019.

Learning Communities in the News