Disability Services

College vs. High School

Grades in High School vs Grades in College

Grades are given for most assigned work. Grades may not be provided for all assigned work.

Consistently good homework grades may help raise your overall grade when test grades are low. Grades on tests and major papers usually provide most of the course grade.

Initial test grades, especially when they are low, may not have an adverse effect on your final grade. Watch out for your first tests. These are usually "wake-up calls" to let you know what is expected--but they also may account for a substantial part of your course grade. You may be shocked when you get your grades.

You may graduate as long as you have passed all required courses with a grade of D or higher. You may graduate only if your average in classes meets the departmental standard--typically a 2.0 or C.

Guiding principle: "Effort counts." Courses are usually structured to reward a "good-faith effort." Guiding principle: "Results count." Though "good-faith effort" is important in regard to the professor's willingness to help you achieve good results, it will not substitute for results in the grading process.

Additional Information

High School Teachers vs College Professors

Tests in High School vs Tests in College

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